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Sex differences in utilisation of hospital care in a state-sponsored health insurance programme providing access to free services in South India.

TitleSex differences in utilisation of hospital care in a state-sponsored health insurance programme providing access to free services in South India.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsShaikh, M, Peters, SAE, Woodward, M, Norton, R, Jha, V
JournalBMJ Glob Health
Volume3
Issue3
Paginatione000859
Date Published06/2018
ISSN2059-7908
Abstract

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<b>Background: </b>Universal healthcare coverage provides healthcare and financial protection to all citizens and might help to facilitate gender equity in care. We assessed the utilisation of hospital care services among women and men in a large underprivileged population with access to free hospital care in India.
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<b>Methods: </b>The Rajiv Aarogyasri Community Health Insurance Scheme, a state-sponsored scheme, provided access to free hospital care for poor households across undivided Andhra Pradesh. Claims data for hospitalisations between 2008 and 2012 were analysed to determine the number of individuals, hospitalisations, bed-days and hospital expenditure for sex-specific and sex-neutral conditions, by sex, disease category and age group.
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<b>Results: </b>A total of 961 442 individuals (43% women), 1 223 723 hospitalisations (48% women), 7.7 million bed-days (47% women) and hospital expenditure of US$579.3 million (42% women) were recorded. Sex-specific conditions accounted for 27% of hospitalisations, 12% of bed-days and 15% of costs for women, compared with 5%, 4% and 4% in men. Women had a lower share of hospitalisations (42%), bed-days (45%) and costs (39%) for sex-neutral conditions than men. These findings were observed across 14 of 18 disease categories and across all age groups, but especially for older and younger women.
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<b>Interpretation: </b>In this large underprivileged population in India with access to free hospital care, utilisation of hospital care differed for women and men. For sex-neutral conditions, women accessed a smaller proportion of care than men, suggesting that coverage of hospital care alone is not sufficient to guarantee gender equity in access to healthcare.
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DOI10.1136/bmjgh-2018-000859
Alternate JournalBMJ Glob Health
PubMed ID29989065
PubMed Central IDPMC6035505
English