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From ground breaking studies and record funding announcements, to major staff achievements and exciting new partnerships, here is a look back at some of The George Institute’s biggest stories in 2017:

The George Institute for Global Health India celebrated its 10th Anniversary today at an event, attended by a large range of stakeholders in healthcare research, policy, communication and delivery.

The George Institute for Global Health welcomes the appointment of a new board member, Meena Thuraisingham.

The George Institute for Global Health today received a landmark investment of $24 million from the Australian Government to undertake research to prevent and treat cardiometabolic diseases, which affect seven million Australians and hundreds of millions globally.

Professor Anushka Patel’s outstanding contributions to the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease has been recognised today in the annual Australian Academy of Science honorific awards.

The Executive Director of The George Institute for Global Health, Australia, Vlado Perkovic, has been appointed to serve on the editorial board of the New England Journal of Medicine.

A drug that lowers blood sugar levels for people with type 2 diabetes produces better renal outcomes, according to new research by The George Institute for Global Health.

A keynote speech by Dr. Shahid Jameel, Chief Executive Officer of the Wellcome Trust/DBT India Alliance, began a wide-ranging and engaging discussion on research collaboration at an event on 27 October 2017 organised by The George Institute for Global Health UK, the Oxford-India Health Research Network and the Oxford-India Centre for Sustainable Development at Somerville College, Oxford.

Australia's National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) has awarded a total of $4.2 million in grants to The George Institute for Global Health to fund projects addressing some of the world's biggest health concerns.

Women with coronary heart disease are less likely to achieve treatment targets than men, finds a study published by the journal Heart today.

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